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Silage

Silage Blog | Wynnstay Agrihub

The Benefits of Autumn Reseeding

The Benefits of Autumn Reseeding

If you didn’t look at reseeding last spring, this autumn could be an ideal time to invest in your forage quantity and quality.

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Do you know the 7 Silage Sins?

7 Silage Sins

When it comes to producing good quality, nutritious silage small things can make a big difference. This is especially true of mistakes. A shortcut or a small oversight can ultimately result in silage that is unusable due to insufficient dry matter content or worse, silage that is dangerous to herd health because of mould growth and the likely presence of mycotoxins or Listeria.

Many farmers have come to accept some issues, particularly with mould, as inevitable and as a necessary evil. The reality is however, it's all too often caused by someone committing one of a number of silage "sins".

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Advantages of Baled Grass Silage within Livestock Feeding Systems

Advantages of Baled Grass Silage within Livestock Feeding Systems

One of the biggest variable costs on livestock farms is undoubtedly feed costs and figures are often quoted that grazed grass is the cheapest feed on the farm at 6p/kg with grass silage at 12p/kg and concentrate at 24p/kg. These are by their very nature 'ball-park' figures. However, if we all agree that grazed grass is the cheapest feed on a farm then one target should be to maximise its use. The second obvious target alongside that is to maximise the use of grass silage in those periods when grazed grass is not sufficient to meet the needs of the stock on your farm. There are many choices to be made when considering grass silage the first being whether to bale or to clamp.

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The Ideal Chop Length

The Ideal Chop Length

In recent times there has been some debate about the ideal chop length for rumen health. In this respect, a useful gauge for chop length is that it should be the width of a cow's mouth! However, only a maximum of 10 per cent should be this long. If there is too much long chopped forage cows will sort the ration and only eat the short chop. In terms of good compaction in a silage clamp, it is absolutely essential to alter the chop length depending on the dry matter content of the forage to be ensiled.

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