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A photo of Bethany Parry

Bethany Parry

Dairy Technical Specialist

Bethany studied Animal Science with Nutrition at The University of Nottingham; specialising in dairy nutrition and fertility, graduating in 2014. Following this, she completed a commercial nutrition graduate scheme with AB Agri before spending two years as Ruminant and Co-product Developer; getting involved in the whole feed process from ‘farm to fork’ and working with leading UK researchers to bring new products to market that capitalise on cost-effective and sustainable production.

12 months ago, Bethany took the plunge and moved in with her partner on a beef and sheep farm on the Llyn peninsula and started a technical sales role for KW feeds covering North Wales.

Joining Wynnstay in 2018, Bethany now covers North Wales as part of the Dairy Technical Services team (living one minute from the Rhosfawr store and blend site is very handy!), with a keen interest in rationing development, nutrition research, and making the best use of home-grown forage’s in combination with appropriate feeds/additives to make production more profitable

How to make the most of Slurry

How to make the most of Slurry

With the spiralling costs of fertiliser this year, more dairy farmers are looking at ways of increasing slurry or manure utilisation and growing more forage from less. Most farms appreciate the value of slurry and use it efficiently, but it is possible to further improve utilisation whilst increasing your farms forage utilisation or milk from forage figure – which is where the true value lies.

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The effects of heat stress on fertility in dairy cows

The effects of heat stress on fertility in dairy cows

The UK is experiencing more frequent heatwaves each summer, with temperatures reaching the highs of 30°C in the day and evening in-shed temperatures staying above 20°C, as a result cows will struggle and performance and fertility may be effected.

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How to prevent grass tetany using a magnesium supplement

How to Prevent Grass Tetany

One of the most effective ways to prevent grass tetany in dairy cows is magnesium supplementation during the risk period. Choosing the supplementation source is quite challenging in practice, magnesium oxide being commonly used to prevent Mg deficiency, but the solubility and therefore the bioavailability varies greatly in practice (1). 

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How to dry off a dairy cow for a succesful transition

Three main check-points for drying off

80% of disease and animal losses in the dairy herd occur from 21 days pre-calving to 60 days post-calving. Here are 3 main check-points for drying off, to ensure a more successful transition:

  • Body condition score 3.0
  • Healthy claws
  • Milk yield at dry off less than 10 litres

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How to tackle grass tetany in cattle

How to tackle grass tetany in cattle

Grazing in the spring often leads to a loss of production in dairy cows. Grass tetany may be the cause. The disease causes a decrease in appetite, milk production and milk fat content. The cause: a lack of magnesium, often associated with a drop in ruminal pH.

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Managing the transition from silage to grazing

Managing the transition from silage to grazing

Dry matter – Is grass providing enough dry matter intake to support the energy requirement for milk production and getting cows back in calf?

Protein – Grass is high in rapidly degradable protein; this needs to be utilised by the rumen microbes in order for them to produce microbial protein. Poorly utilised protein can have a negative impact on fertility and limit milk yield.

Rapidly fermentable carbohydrates – Early season grass is high in sugar (and digestible fibre), this can be an issue for rumen health. A consequence of this can be milk fat depression and a reduction in milk value. It is important to understand the nutrient content of grass. Fresh grass analysis throughout the grazing period will provide useful information about the points above.

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Could mycotoxins be an issue this winter?

Could mycotoxins be an issue this winter?

Quantifying the level of mycotoxin contamination in your feeds is always difficult, as there are >400 different species of mycotoxins, all with varying levels of toxicity, and they may not be in every part of the silage clamp or TMR that we sample! Generally speaking, any plant with a flowering head (such as maize or wheat) could have developed fungi in the field, under stress conditions such as drought or wet weather, which produce the ‘in field’ mycotoxins on the plant. When harvested, the mycotoxins remain in the silage, and in some cases, further mould/fungi growth in the clamp can lead to more ‘storage’ mycotoxin production.

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Maintain Performance with Variable First Cut Silages This Autumn

Maintain Performance with Variable First Cut Silages This Autumn

Silage analysis from across the country has shown a wide variation in nutrient analysis, partly due to the challenging weather conditions impacting cutting times between farms. There have been some early first-cut silages, and then later first-cuts, which are quite different from each other in protein, energy and digestibility, according to Trouw GB’s silage-watch. This may pose feeding challenges to farmers moving between cuts this autumn, as well as large variability between farms, and consideration needs to be given to the balance of the ration to optimise rumen health and maintain performance.

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QLF protein molasses- the perfect match for maize silage or lower protein grass silages

QLF protein molasses- the perfect match for maize silage or lower protein grass silages

This spring saw cool and wet spells, which had an impact on harvesting windows and according to Trouw Nutrition GB analysis, has resulted in variable silages across the UK. 2021 seems to have produced some excellent maize yields, which in a challenging year for grass silage quality, will fill the shortfall in forage in many diets this winter. However, high maize silage diets coupled with lower protein grass silages may leave a shortfall of rumen degradable protein in rations.

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Balancing the Ration to Optimise Rumen Health

Balancing the Ration to Optimise Rumen Health

Recent silage analysis from across the country has show variation in nutrient analysis, this may pose feeding challenges to farmers this Autumn and consideration needs to be given to balancing the ration to optimise rumen health and maintain performance

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