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Dairy Farming

Start Planning Your Parasite Control For Housing Dairy Animals Now

Start Planning Your Parasite Control For Housing Dairy Animals Now

Now is the time to consider parasite control for animals that will be housed over the winter period. In conjunction with your RAMA or vet, you need to work out what parasites you need to treat, which products to use, and when to administer them.

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Maintain Performance with Variable First Cut Silages This Autumn

Maintain Performance with Variable First Cut Silages This Autumn

Silage analysis from across the country has shown a wide variation in nutrient analysis, partly due to the challenging weather conditions impacting cutting times between farms. There have been some early first-cut silages, and then later first-cuts, which are quite different from each other in protein, energy and digestibility, according to Trouw GB’s silage-watch. This may pose feeding challenges to farmers moving between cuts this autumn, as well as large variability between farms, and consideration needs to be given to the balance of the ration to optimise rumen health and maintain performance.

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Raw Material Market Update Autumn 2021

Raw Material Market Update Autumn 2021

As the summer draws towards an end, farmers will begin to turn their attention to contracting their feed for the winter period, no doubt decisions on whether or not to contract will be the subject of much discussion in the farming community. However, it’s difficult to see what factors would now drive down the November-April period.

Weather has had a major impact this year on crops around the world, droughts stretching from Canada to Brazil has hit wheat, maize, soya and rapemeal crops hard, and month after month, the USDA along with independent analyst’s keep reducing yield forecasts. It’s been a similar story across Europe and Russia with crops being hit by either drought or extreme flooding, this comes at a period when world stocks are already at very low levels and there will be little carryover from one crop season to the other.

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QLF protein molasses- the perfect match for maize silage or lower protein grass silages

ideal for maize & grass silage

This spring saw cool and wet spells, which had an impact on harvesting windows and according to Trouw Nutrition GB analysis, has resulted in variable silages across the UK. 2021 seems to have produced some excellent maize yields, which in a challenging year for grass silage quality, will fill the shortfall in forage in many diets this winter. However, high maize silage diets coupled with lower protein grass silages may leave a shortfall of rumen degradable protein in rations.

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4 Things to Consider When Moving to a Robotic Parlour Dairy System

Four Things to Consider When Moving to a Robotic Parlour Dairy System

With proven benefits to cow health and welfare, herd productivity and farmer work-life-balance, robotic milking systems are increasing in popularity.

If you’re looking to make the transition, Wynnstay head of dairy services, David Howard, gives his four top tips for those considering introducing robots to their farm.

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The 4 Key Areas of Dry Cow Management

The four ‘F’s’ of dry cow management

The transition period impacts cow health, fertility and production, therefore, effective and efficient management during this time is key. To do so, Wynnstay dairy specialist David Jones, recommends focussing on four F’s: feet, forage, feed and facilities.

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Balancing the Ration to Optimise Rumen Health

Balancing the Ration to Optimise Rumen Health

Recent silage analysis from across the country has show variation in nutrient analysis, this may pose feeding challenges to farmers this Autumn and consideration needs to be given to balancing the ration to optimise rumen health and maintain performance

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The Functions of Minerals

The Functions of Minerals

Minerals are necessary to sustain life but you might be surprised by how many cow and calf operations are mineral deficient, especially when it comes to copper and Selenium. Here is our guide to minerals and the roles they play in keeping your livestock healthy.

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Considerations for Pregnant Heifers

Considerations for Pregnant Heifers

Energy demand for any dairy animal depends on their specific requirement for; maintenance, reproduction, milk production and body reserves. Whilst our mature cows are pregnant their energy demand is focussed on maintenance and foetal growth.

As a heifer progresses through the pregnancy we must consider she is still undergoing her own continued development including her own maintenance, growth, mammary tissue growth/development, and then in the last trimester of pregnancy, the foetus goes through a huge growth phase and, therefore, energy demand increases significantly and quickly (from day 191). Some farms look to balance the diet for a heifer at 141 days (to take an average of her requirement throughout) but this is not sufficient for the third trimester as the demand for energy and protein is far greater.

The expected calf birth weight and day of gestation can be used to calculate a heifer’s requirement for metabolisable energy and protein. The risk of undersupplying energy is that the dam will prioritise the energy she has got available to the development of her calf resulting in her growth slowing or stopping altogether. This may result in difficult calving as she has not grown to the expected size.

It is important to know intakes at stages through pregnancy; pre-calving we can assume consumption to be 1.75% of body weight but this depends on the palatability of the ration put in front of them. Because heifers begin to eat lesser quantities they need the diet to be more energy-dense.

Heifers should be entering the milking parlour at 82% - 90% mature bodyweight post-calving to optimise first lactation yield (Van Amburgh et al., 1998). We can work on a relatively accurate estimation that heifers will produce the same percentage of milk of a mature cow as to what she is as a percentage of her mature weight i.e if she only enters the milking herd at 70% of mature weight, we can only expect 70% of mature cow’s milk yield from her as she is still needing a proportion of energy intake for own growth.

As with all animals, clean, fresh and plentiful water access should be available at all times and this will encourage dry matter intakes.

Feeding Seperate Diets

On some farm set-ups, it can be difficult to run two separate groups and feed two separate diets. Often it is seen as a balancing act and diets are formulated to be in the middle of mature cow and heifer requirements. The problem with this is that the diet can be of higher energy than what dry cows need and lower energy than what heifers require and, due to physical capacity, the dry cows are able to consume more. So, heifers are fed restricted protein and energy.

If we don’t account for this higher energy demand for the heifers and their need for a higher energy-dense diet, then we risk them mobilising fat from their own reserves and have high levels of NEFA’s prior to calving. Reduced dry matter intake pre-calving can lead to the same post-calving and predispose the animal to ketosis and fatty liver syndrome.

Feeding highly digestible fibre forages to help meet demand.

It is important to consider heifers are producing colostrum in the last six weeks of pregnancy and, if they are deficient in energy and protein, we cannot expect them to produce high-quality colostrum.


Focus on Calves Brochure 2021

In our 8th edition of Focus on Calves discover helpful articles from feeding to the correct use of calf jackets, written by the Wynnstay Calf & Youngstock team plus guest writers such as Anna Bowen, Nuffield Scholar. 

Keep the kids busy with our front page colouring activity and don't forget to enter our exclusive competition for a chance to win a pallet of Elixir+ Calf Milk Replacer.

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